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Pupil Premium

What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil Premium was introduced by the Department for Education (DfE) in 2011, as additional funding for pupils who receive Free School Meals and who are Looked After Children. This is because the DfE recognised that good education is key to improving children's life chances, particularly those from low-income families, or Looked After Children. Research shows that without intervention these children are less likely to achieve good GCSEs than other children. The Pupil Premium, using additional resources from outside the School’s Budget, is intended to address inequalities by ensuring that funding reaches the pupils who need it most.

Pupil Premium is also available for children whose parents are currently serving in the armed forces in order to address the emotional and social well-being of these pupils.

The DfE state that schools have the right to spend this funding as they see fit based upon their knowledge of children's needs.  There is obvious accountability that serves to ensure that the money is used effectively and to the benefit of these key groups.

Schools, headteachers and teachers will decide how to use the Pupil Premium allocation, as they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for individual pupils.”

Source - DfE website

 

 

Planned Expenditure 2017-18
  1. Summary information

School

Cherry Tree Academy

Academic Year

2017-18

Total PP budget

135,960

Date of most recent PP Review

July 2017

Total number of pupils

296

(excl. LFS)

Number of pupils eligible for PP

90

Date for next internal review of this strategy

January 2018

 

  1. Current attainment

Disadvantaged Pupil

Non-Disadvantaged Pupils

 

2017

Year 6

ARE+

2017

Year 6 HS/GD

2017

Year 2

ARE+

2017

Year 2

HS/GD

 

2017

EYFS

GLD

2017

Year 6

ARE+

2017

Year 2 ARE+

2017

EYFS

GLD

% achieving in reading, writing and maths/GLD

41

65

 

 

100

(1 pupil)

0

 

55

% achieving in reading

50

14

79

7

100

74

74

61

% achieving in writing

64

5

36

7

100

65

67

55

% achieving in

86

74

50

7

100

9

74

66

 

 

Y6 School

Disadvantaged

 

Y6 School

Non-disadvantaged

 

Progress in Reading

-4.13

-3.53

Progress in Writing

-3.98

-4.39

Progress in Maths

0.33

-3.87

Absence

2015

2016

2017

School non-disadvantaged pupils

 

6.7

6.0

6.4

4.6

4.7

4.7

 

School all pupils

 

National all pupils

 

5.3

5.3

5.2

 

3.9

3.9

 

 

  1. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

  1.  

Behaviour for learning of disadvantaged pupils is poorer than non-disadvantaged pupils.

  1.  

General behaviour of disadvantaged pupils, particularly boys, during unstructured times such as lunchtimes

C.

Engagement of parents in their children’s learning throughout school is low.

D.

Oral language skills are lower for pupils eligible for PP than for other pupils. This slows reading progress.

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

E.

Attendance and punctuality across school is below national and the attendance of disadvantaged pupils is below non-disadvantaged pupils.

 

 

  1. Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

  1.  

Children engage positively in learning activities.

A reduction in the time and frequency pupils are off task as observed in lessons; children make progress within lessons and overtime.

  1.  

Children engage positively in social interactions with others.

A reduction in the number of recorded negative incidents.

  1.  

Increase in parents engaging in learning activities in and out of school.

Increase in attendance at ‘learning’ based events; pupils achieving reading stars; increased attendance at assemblies and events.

  1.  

Improved written and oral responses to stimuli and increased opportunities for participation in drama/discussion based activities.

Increased and higher-level vocabulary orally and in written work; improved comprehension in reading.

       

 

  1. Planned expenditure

Academic year

 

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

  1. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Children engage positively in learning activities.

 

Improved written and oral responses to stimuli and increased opportunities for participation in drama/discussion based activities.

 

 

 

 

 

Talk for Writing

 

Development of oracy skills.

Evidence from other schools shows positive outcomes for reading and writing.

 

Education Endowment Foundation T4W Evaluation report

Staff discussions

Lesson observations

Planning

Work scrutiny

Pupil voice

 

Helen Jones (Lit. Lead)

 

SLT

TBC

Total budgeted cost

£1000

  1. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Children engage positively in learning activities.

 

Children make improved progress in core subjects.

Strategy for effective use of support staff:

targeted in-class support

pre-teaching to improve access to quality first teaching

 

Outwood Institute for Education

 

2016-17 Y6 SATs outcomes (maths)

 

Staff discussions

Lesson observations

Planning

Work scrutiny

 

TBC

January 2018

Children make improved progress in core subjects.

Continuation of interventions which have demonstrated clear impact:

 

1:1 provision of CatchUp Reading intervention for pupils in KS1

 

 

 

1:1 provision of 1st Class@Numbers intervention for pupils in KS1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the students need targeted support to catch up. This is a programme which has been independently evaluated and shown to be effective in other schools and at Cherry Tree Academy.

 

This is a programme which has been independently evaluated and shown to be effective in other schools as well as Cherry Tree Academy.

 

 

Organise timetable to ensure staff delivering provision have sufficient preparation and delivery time.

.

Provide additional Teaching Assistants to work with pupils in the delivery of these interventions.

Ks1 Lead

 

School improvement lead

 

HT

 

DHT

January 2018

Children in Early Years demonstrate improved speech and language skills

Implementation of WELLCOM intervention in LFS and UFS.

91% of pupils in LFS and UFS are currently below in speaking and understanding (three of these children are receiving support from a speech therapist)

 

In UFS, 55% of pupils are below ARE for speaking and 63% are below for understanding.

 

The intervention comes highly recommended by the speech therapist and has had a positive impact in other schools in the MAT.

Organise timetable to ensure staff delivering provision have sufficient preparation and delivery time.

 

Tracking of assessments

 

Pupil observations

EYFS Lead

 

DSENCo

January 2018

Total budgeted cost

CatchUp £9,500

1st Class £9,500

TA £17,500

TA £17,500

WELLCOM £330

 

£54,330

 

  1. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Improved attendance rates.

 

 

Learning Mentor to monitor pupils and follow up quickly on absences.

 

First day response provision.

 

Weekly meetings with MAT EWO

 

Collecting pupils by car where families need the short term support – crossover time in nurture room so pupils don’t go into class ‘blind’.

 

Certificates home re. positive attendance.

 

Text reminder for attendance.

 

Family rewards for improved and 100% attendance.

At the end of 2016-17 the attendance of disadvantaged pupils was 92.54%.

 

Research shows that pupils who miss 24 days in September go on to miss nearly a month of school in the whole year (Attendance Works, USA).

 

Research shows that missing 10% of school leads to poor academic performance.

(Attendance Works, USA).

 

Disadvantaged pupils are four times more likely to have persistent absence than their peers often for reasons beyond their control.

 

 

 

 

Recruitment of appropriate Learning Mentor.

 

HT / DHT involved in house visits.

 

Appropriate staff levels in classes and the nurture room to facilitate smooth return to school.

 

Regular monitoring of individuals.

 

Liaise with local business for family incentives.

 

 

HT

 

DHT

 

Learning Mentor

January 2018

Pupils have the nutrients and calm start to the day which will make them more ready to learn.

 

Many disadvantaged pupils arrive to school rushed and either without breakfast or having had a hectic start to the day.

 

Charitable organisation ‘Magic Breakfast’ state that 32% of pupils miss breakfast and 93% of schools involved with them have reported increased concentration in breakfast club attendees.

 

The EEF is currently undergoing its own research.

 

A report by the ESRC (Economic & Social Research Council) from March 2016 cites the positive impact of breakfast clubs in a controlled investigation of 53 schools with and 53 without, outcomes were as follows in the schools with breakfast clubs:

· Y2 pupils made 2 months progress over the year in all core subjects;

· Y6 pupils made 2 months progress in English and Maths;

· Pupil absences declined by almost two days per year;

· Behaviour improved in class having a wider impact on others.

 

Visit effective Breakfast Club settings

 

Monitor attendance and behaviour incidents

 

Observe pupils in class

 

Book scrutinies

 

Data and assessment tracking

HT

 

BC leaders

January 2018

Improved outcomes as a result of improved learning, social and emotional behaviours.

Learning mentor and nurture team to carry out nurture work including social skills, anger management, anxiety, grief and loss, behaviour management etc.

A number of pupils involved in the nurture room last academic year achieved high attainment outcomes at the end of Y6.

 

A number of pupils who accessed the nurture room last year are now in mainstream classes.

Tracking of behavioural incidents

 

Outcomes of key pupils.

 

Pupil voice

 

Pupil observations

Learning Mentor

 

DHT

January 2018

Increased aspirations and knowledge of the world.

Enable pupils to engage in different academic, artistic and cultural experiences by contributing to the cost of school visits for those disadvantaged pupils whose families are unable to sustain the cost.

Research by the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom asserts that,

‘the Government advocates the use of the Pupil Premium for LOtC activities; and signposts to resources making the case for LOtC, proving the benefits in terms of attainment; achievement; behaviour; attendance; engagement; wellbeing and personal, social and emotional development’

(Pupil Premium Using the Pupil Premium for learning outside the classroom)

Pupil voice

 

Observations of attitudes to learning

 

Work scrutinies

Assistant Headteacher

 

DHT

January 2018

Total budgeted cost

Learning Mentor: £20, 738

2x nurture TAs: £17,381 (each)

Petrol: £150

Insurance: £200

Postage: £200

Breakfast: £17,000 (if half eligible pupils attend)

Visits: £5000

 

£78,050

 

 


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